VLC Energy announces large energy storage projects in the U.K.

Energy storage plants to be connected to the electricity network by year end

© LG Chem | Low Carbon

© LG Chem | Low Carbon

VLC Energy (London, UK) announced the development of two of the UK’s largest energy storage plants, to be connected to the electricity network by year end.

The newly created company is a joint venture between Low Carbon, a renewable energy investment company, and VPI Immingham, owner of one of the largest combined heat and power plants in Europe and part of the Vitol Group.

The first multi-million dollar projects to be developed by VLC Energy include two of the UK’s largest energy storage plants in Cleator in Cumbria and Glassenbury in Kent.

The energy storage plants were awarded contracts in the National Grid’s Enhanced Frequency Response (EFR) tender process, as well as the Capacity Market Auction for delivery in 2020.

Lithium-ion battery technology from LG Chem

The Cleator and Glassenbury sites will have a combined capacity of 50 MW (35 MWh) accounting for 25% of the total EFR contract capacity awarded by National Grid.

The battery projects will harness the latest Lithium-ion battery technology from LG Chem and sophisticated energy management systems from NEC Energy Solutions, Inc. to provide a vital balancing service to National Grid, with almost instantaneous responses of less than one second to surges in energy supply and demand.

This rapid response service will provide significant cost savings to National Grid, with some estimates suggesting as much as USD 250 million (£200 million) in savings across all EFR contracts, by reducing wasted energy.